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Read book World History Through Islamic Eyes. by Mir Tamim Ansary in IBOOKS, AZW3, DOCX, TXT

Author: Mir Tamim Ansary
Publisher: Perseus Books Group 2009.
ISBNISSN: 1586486063, :, HRD, 9781586486068, :, HRD
Notes: 368 pages
Responsibility: World History Through Islamic Eyes.
Schrödinger's kitten --
Marîd changes his mind --
Slow, slow burn --
Marîd and the trail of blood --
King of the cyber rifles --
Marîd throws a party --
The world as we know it --
The city on the sand --
The plastic Pasha. Preface to the Second Edition; Preface to the First Edition; Sources and Acknowledgements; Acronyms; The Great Globalization Debate: An Introduction David Held and Anthony McGrew; Part I Understanding Globalization; Introduction; Chapter 1: Globalization, George Modelski, Professor of Political Science at the University of Washington; Chapter 2: The Globalizing of Modernity, Anthony Giddens, Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. He was formerly Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of King s College, Cambridge; Chapter 3: Rethinking Globalization, David Held, Graham Wallas Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Anthony McGrew, Professor of International Relations at Southampton University; Chapter 4: Globalization: What s New? What s Not? (And So What?), Robert O. Keohane, James B. Duke Professor of Political Science at Duke University and Joseph Nye, Dean of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University; Chapter 5: What is Global about Globalization? Jan Aarte Scholte, Reader in International Studies at the University of Warwick; Chapter 6: The Problem of Globalization Theory, Justin Rosenberg; Chapter 7: Globalization A Necessary Myth, Paul Hirst, Professor of Social Theory at Birkbeck College, University of London and Grahame Thompsor, Professor of Political Economy at the Open University; Chapter 8: Clash of Globalizations, Stanley Hoffman, Battenwieser University Professor at Harvard University; Chapter 9: Globalization and American Power, Joseph S. Nye, Dean of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University; Chapter 10 Globalization as Empire, Michael Hardt, Associate Professor of Literature and Romance Studies at Duke University and Antonio Negri, author of "Empire" with Michael Hardt; Part II Political Power and Civil Society: A Reconfiguration? Introduction; Chapter 11: The Declining Authority of States, Susan Strange, formerly a Visiting Professor at the University of Warwick. Chapter 12: Has Globalization Ended the Rise and Rise of the Nation-State? Michael Mann, Professor of Sociology at UCLA; Chapter 13: Sovereignty in International Society, Robert Keohane, James B. Duke Professor of Political Science at Duke University; Chapter 14: Compromising Westphalia, Stephen D. Krasner, Professor of Political Science at Stanford University; Chapter 15: The Changing Structure of International Law: Sovereignty Transformed? David Held, Graham Wallas Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science; Chapter 16: The Security State, Ian Clark, Professor of International Politics at the University of Wales; Chapter 17: Governing the Global Economy Through Government Networks, Anne-Marie Slaughter dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University; Chapter 18: Power Shift, Jessica T. Matthews, Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; Chapter 19: Globalization and Modes of Regionalist Governance, Anthony Payne, Professor of Politics at the University of Sheffield; Chapter 20: Governance in a New Global Order, James N. Rosenau, University Professor of International Affairs at the George Washington University; Part III The Fate of National Culture in an Age of Global Communication; Introduction; Chapter 21: Encountering Globalization, Kevin Robins, Professor of Communications at Goldsmiths College; Chapter 22: The Globalization of Communication, John B. Thompson Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge; Chapter 23: The New Global Media, Robert McChesney, Professor at the Institute of Communications Research, University of Illinois; Chapter 24: Globalization and Cultural Identity, John Tomlinson, Director of the Centre for Research in International Communication and Culture, Nottingham Trent University; Chapter 25: Towards a Global Culture? Anthony D. Smith, Professor of Ethnicity and Nationalism at the European Institute, London School of Economics and Political Science; Chapter 26: Global Governance and Cosmopolitan Citizens, Pippa Norris, Professor at the J. F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; Part IV A Global Economy? Introduction; Chapter 27: A New Geo-economy, Peter Dicken, Professor of Geography at the University of Manchester; Chapter 28: Global Informational Capitalism, Manuel Castells, Professor of Sociology and Urban Planning at the University of California at Berkeley; Chapter 29: The Limits to Economic Globalization, Paul Hirst, Professor of Social Theory at Birkbeck College, University of London and Grahame Thompsor, Professor of Political Economy at the Open University; Chapter 30: The Nation-State in the Global Economy, Robert Gilpin, Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University; Chapter 31: Global Market versus the New Regionalism, Bjorn Hettne, Professor at the Department of Peace and Development Research, Goteborg University; Chapter 32: Globalization and the Political Economy of Capitalist Democracies, Fritz Scharpf Professor at the Max Planck Institute, University of Koin; Chapter 33: Has Globalization Gone Too Far? Dani Rodrik, Rafiq Hariri Professor of International Political Economy at Harvard University; Chapter 34: Global Markets and National Politics, Geoffrey Garrett, Professor of Political Science at Yale University; Chapter 35: The Effect of Globalization on Taxation, Institutions and Control of the Macroeconomy, Duane Swank, Associate Professor of Political Science at Marquette University; Part V Divided World, Divided Nations; Introduction; Chapter 36: Patterns of Global Inequality, United Nations Development Programme; Chapter 37: The Rise of the Fourth World, Manuel Castells, Professor of Sociology and Urban Planning at the University of California at Berkeley; Chapter 38: Are Global Poverty and Inequality Getting Worse? Robert Wade, Professor of Political Economy at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Martin Wolf, chief economics commentator of the Financial Times; Chapter 39: Spreading the Wealth, David Dollar and Aart Kraay, economists at the World Banks Development Research Group; Chapter 40: Globalization and Gendered Inequality, Jill Steans, Lecturer in International Relations Theory at the University of Birmingham; Chapter 41: Order, Globalization and Inequality in World Politics, Ngaire Woods, Fellow in Politics and International Relations at University College, Oxford; Chapter 42: The Promise of Global Institutions, Joseph Stiglitz, Professor of Economics and Finance at the University of Columbia; Part VI World Orders, Normative Choices; Introduction; Chapter 43: Global Governance: Prospects and Problems, Fred Halliday, Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science; Chapter 44: Models of Transnational Democracy, Anthony McGrew, Professor of International Relations at Southampton University; Chapter 45: Cosmopolitanism: Taming Globalization, David Held, Graham Wallas Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science; Chapter 46: Can International Organizations be Democractic? A Sceptics View, Robert Dahl, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Yale University; Chapter 47: The Postnational Constellation, Jurgen Habermas, Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at the University of Frankfurt; Chapter 48: Priorities of Global Justice, Thomas W. Pogge, Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Columbia University; Chapter 49: Global Civil Society, Mary Kaldor, Director of the Global Civil Society Programme at the London School of Economics and Political Science; Chapter 50: A World Gone Wrong? Chris Brown, Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science; Chapter 51 Beyond the States System? Hedley Bull, formerly Montague Burton Professor of International Relations, University of Oxford These nine tales are set in Budayeen, the walled city in the sand, a city of dark shadows and even darker inhabitants, where a Raymond Chandleresque vision has been created--hardboiled, noir, futuristic--but with a twist. The sights, smells, and denizens of Budayeen are brought to life--from the city's sordid, decadent underbelly to the glamorous excesses of the sex industry.